FASCINATING PEOPLE, FORWARD-LOOKING TOPICS

Once a year, the Hertie Summit brings together international young experts and facilitates an exchange on current socio-political and science policy issues.

More than just living together: Pulling together

WHAT KIND OF FUTURE AWAITS US? AND HOW CAN WE SHAPE IT TOGETHER? 
THE HERTIE SUMMIT IN BERLIN FROM 3 TO 4 JUNE 2021

Among our Fellows, you will find people who are conducting research in the natural sciences, experts in the fields of politics, law and economics, people who create works of art and people who explore the world from the perspective of the humanities and cultural studies. As different as their disciplines and fields of activity may be, they all have one thing in common: they all strive to ensure that we can live together better as a democratic society. They work to strengthen cohesion and they take on responsibility. The Summit agenda is set by the Fellows themselves. This unique format allows them to create a space where new encounters can take place and where current topics can be discussed. At the same time, they provide a forum for innovations that aim to not only advance our society, but also bring it together. The coronavirus pandemic perfectly demonstrates how important this approach is. Reflecting on the months of distancing, polarisation and worry we have all been through, we decided that our motto for the Hertie Summit 2021 would be: “More than just living together: pulling together”.

Summit Programme and Registration

The programme at a glance

Here, you can download the complete programme for the Hertie Summit as a PDF. Please find a detailed programme description as well as short biographies of selected guests below the registration button on this website. 

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Thursday, 3. June 2021

Welcome & Moderators

3:50 pm - 4:00 pm Opening of the Hertie Summits 1st day (main stage)

Mona Mann and Sebastian Heunemann (Hertie Foundation) will guide you through the Summit's programme (in German/translated into English). 

FROM 4 PM TO 5:30 PM

Programme Preview

Diversity in schools and universities: Strategies for tackling racial discrimination in the German education system

A few years ago, many posts appeared on the internet with the hashtag #metwo, which people who had experienced racism were using to share their experiences of racist discrimination at school and university. At the time, many were shocked by the discrimination that seemed to be rife in German classrooms and seminar rooms.

Many people are still being affected by racism in educational institutions on a daily basis. The factors contributing to this include only structural problems such as the lack of diversity in German classrooms and among university teaching staff, or racist and anti-Semitic attitudes in the majority society, but also deficits in the discourse about what racism is and how to combat it. Whatever form racism takes, whether it is school pupils not being set on the educational paths that can take them to university (Gymnasium) despite excellent grades, or whether it is teachers and fellow pupils making racist jokes, we as a society need to work on the underlying structures, our attitudes and our knowledge if we are to move forward and provide a safe learning environment for everyone.

This panel discussion will bring together experts in anti-racist work and education to share their concepts and ideas for a better future. We will start with various scenarios for the German education landscape of 2030 and then we will engage in discussion with the audience, listen to critical voices, break down barriers and find solutions.

Format: digital panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests:

- Tania Bloch, specialist in special needs education and media education, Munich

- Dr. Nushin Hosseini-Eckhardt, philosopher of education, Dortmund University of Technology

- Jeffrey Klein, head of the antidiscrimination project EACH ONE by Each One Teach One e. V. (EOTO)

Moderator: Ouassima Laabich-Mansour, expert in the critique of racism and doctoral candidate at the Free University of Berlin

Language: German

Concept by: Anna Delius, Hertie Foundation

Between integration and belonging

The migration crisis of 2015 rekindled the debate on integration in Germany. Now, once again, people hold very divergent views about what living together in an open society should look like. The debate is often focused on Arab and Muslim Germans and/or migrants. Frequently, it is also tainted with misconceptions and misrepresentations that contribute more to exclusion than they do to integration.

To counteract this, we would like to offer some new perspectives and discuss the question: what does belonging mean in the German context? Our event will feature organisations and speakers who want to change the prevailing narrative and reshape how we live together. The discussion will be recorded.

Format: panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests:

- Sophia Burton, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Migration Matters e.V.

- Prof. Dr. Naika Foroutan, Humboldt University Berlin, Berliner Institut für empirische Migrations- und Integrationsforschung (BIM) 

- Fabio Ghelli, Editor at Mediendienst Integration, Berlin 

- Moderator: Victoria Kleber, freelance journalist and documentary filmer 

Language: English

Concept by: Mariam Hamad, migration and diversity expert and graduate of the Hertie School

Democracy & climate crisis: Perspectives on the European Green Deal

Europe is meant to become climate-neutral by 2050. This is what the Green New Deal requires. The European Commission launched the European Green Deal as a flagship initiative to introduce climate legislation aimed at achieving climate neutrality. The goal of zero net greenhouse gas emissions will require a massive reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also require us to move away from burning fossil fuels and invest in clean industrial systems and energy systems. The EU’s main instrument for reducing emissions, the EU ETS, will play a crucial role in achieving this. It is due to be revised in June 2021. But there are also some new instruments that are being discussed, such as carbon contracts for difference (CCfDs)—which are designed to reduce uncertainty around emission prices for particularly innovative projects—and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM is intended to compensate for different carbon emission reduction objectives in different countries, and thus prevent “carbon leakage”: the shifting of carbon emissions to countries with less ambitious targets.

The Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN) event series at the Hertie Summit 2021 will focus on the question of which strategies are best suited to combating the climate crisis without jeopardizing the competitiveness of our industries.

Format: Part 1 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Part 1: Perspectives on the European Green Deal

4:00 - 4:30 pm Introduction to the Hertie Energy & Environment Network and the event

Moderator: Dr. Andreas Schröder, Board Hertie Energy and Environment Network

4:30 - 5:30 pm panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests:
- Dr. Philipp Steinberg, Director General Economic Policy, Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy
- Damian Boeselager, MEP, Volt
- Andreas Graf, Project Manager, Agora Energiewende, Brussels
- Viola Rocher, Head of Brussels Office, EnBW

Moderator: Lara Schech, Board Member of the Hertie Energy and Environment Network

Language: English

Concept by: Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN)

Agenda HEEN & Speakers' biographies (complete): t3://file?uid=13303

B(u)ilding 4.0 - Life Orientation for the VUCA World

The digital transformation of the economic and working world was on the agenda anyway. With the current Corona crisis and the impending climate crisis, the need to radically transform the social order is accelerating. Jeremy Rifkin recommends to the current workforce to use the next 10-15 years to create the initial conditions for a livable, sustainable future with the technological means of our time. The central challenge of our time is to work towards this at all social levels and to bring as many people as possible along on the journey. How do we prepare young people for this transition and the future world, even if they are not pursuing an academic education? Here, we will first provide a general thought impulse with initial suggestions, which we can then discuss and develop together.

Format: Lecture 

Guest: 

Dr. Anja C. Wagner, Independent Education Expert, frolleinflow 

Moderator:  Mirko Meyerding, Coordinator of the Initiative Starke Schule (Strong School Initiative) and Headteacher of Gesamtschule  Ebsdorfer Grund (Ebsdorfer Grund School), and Laura Herrmann, student of Educational Sciences at the Humboldt University of Berlin and Student Assistant at the Hertie Foundation 

Language: German

Concept by: Mirko Meyerding, Coordinator of Initiative Starke Schule (Strong School Initiative) and Headteacher of Gesamtschule  Ebsdorfer Grund (Ebsdorfer Grund School) in Ebsdorfergrund 

Community living projects and the New European Bauhaus: what role will they play in the future?

Co-Housing and other participatory forms of communal living are examples of future-oriented projects in cities. The people behind these projects often come from different professional backgrounds. Many community living projects open up parts of their premises to the public or make them available to use as venues for events, such as workshops.

In this round of discussions, we want to take a look at Berlin and the projects that are running there: What forms of communal living exist in Berlin and what roles do they play in society? What participatory structures make new housing projects possible? What cooperation models does the city of the future need?

We will discuss these questions with representatives of independent projects and with experts on housing and urban development. We will be broadcasting live from the Spreefeld Cooperative. The cooperative is also one of the examples we will be looking at in more detail in our discussion. In the spirit of the New European Bauhaus, we will look at existing forms of communal living and their potential for the future from an internal perspective, but also from a political perspective. Behind these projects, there are various cooperation models that address the issue of limited living space in Berlin.

Format: digital panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests:
- Wenke Christoph, State Secretary for Housing of the State of Berlin
- Dr. Michael LaFond, expert on communal living communities
- Caroline Rosenthal, Consultant for “Mietshäuser Syndikat”

Moderator: Natalia Irina Roman, graduate of the Hertie School

Language: English

Concept by: Natalia Irina Roman, graduate of the Hertie School

Kick-off meeting for the mentoring programme 2021/2022 (part 1)

This year, the mentoring programme  will kick off with a digital gathering of current mentors and mentees. There will be an introduction to the programme and the basics of mentoring, and the tandem pairs will get to know each other and all the other participants. The digital gathering will be the foundation for cooperation over the next eight months, both in the tandem pairs and in the group as a whole.

For years, our mentoring programme has been supporting Fellows who want to help shape society as active citizens and take on responsible roles in the areas of science, business, culture, politics and administration. The aim of the mentoring programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation is to provide targeted support for Hertie Fellows as current and future decision-makers and active shapers of the future as they work in the fields of science, business, politics, culture, civil society and administration. Here, mentors and mentees work together as equals. Each mentor supports their mentee with important aspects of their (early) professional life or with personal projects. The programme thrives as a result of the dedication of our Fellows in our diverse, international Fellows Network.

Format: digital workshop

Who can participate: closed event. Please note that only members of the current cohort of the GHS Mentoring Programme can take part in the kick-off event.

Language: German/English

Moderator: Heike Fahrun

From 6:30 pm to 8 pm

Programme Preview

Lecure: Navigating uncertainty: how entrepreneurs can inspire us to dare to try something new

“Nothing in the history of life is more constant than change” (Charles Darwin) and yet many people have never learned to mould changes, to develop new things or to operate in contexts of uncertainty. Our current situation highlights just how powerful sudden changes to the familiar and expected can be. Many people have been forced to abandon established patterns, rhythms and habits, or to reinvent themselves professionally or personally. But how do we experience change and how do we shape it? What prevents us from trying new things? And what strategies and behaviours could help us navigate through uncertainty, recognise opportunities, and take a chance?

In her opening address, Miriam Yasbay will shed light on how something new can emerge. The talk will focus on insights into the lives and working worlds of 12 entrepreneurs, which Yasbay analyses in her recently published book “The Invisible Strategies of Entrepreneurs”, revealing inspiring, diverse and sometimes surprising perspectives and behaviours. In this talk, she will share some of the insights she has gained from her years working as a social researcher, innovation designer and entrepreneur. She will also discuss the key behavioural strategies used to initiate and shape change processes.

Format: keynote speech

Moderator: Agata Werner, Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: German/English (with simultaneous interpretation)

Finding the right words: how to leverage neurological insights in rhetoric

Any given argument will convince some people, but not others. Often this has less to do with the plausibility of the argument than it has to do with the way it is presented. This is because every person has their own language code. This inspiring, interactive webinar will demonstrate how to decipher that code and harness it. The goal is to find the right words to reach each and every person. This digital lecture will introduce the neuroscience behind successful communication, provide an introduction to type-appropriate rhetoric and expand the participants’ own language codes. Participants will reflect on their own preferred language code, including its strengths and opportunities for development, as well as on their unconscious communicative “blind spot”. Participants will learn how to decipher the language codes of their counterparts in order to get their message across precisely. In a short practical exercise using an example, participants will translate their message into the language of their target group(s).

Speaker: Anita Hermann-Ruess,  Founder and Managing Director of Hermann-Ruess & Partner,

Format: Talk

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: German

Democracy & climate crisis: German Climate Policy in the context of the EU Green Deal and ETS reform

Europe is meant to become climate-neutral by 2050. This is what the Green New Deal requires. The European Commission launched the European Green Deal as a flagship initiative to introduce climate legislation aimed at achieving climate neutrality. The goal of zero net greenhouse gas emissions will require a massive reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also require us to move away from burning fossil fuels and invest in clean industrial systems and energy systems. The EU’s main instrument for reducing emissions, the EU ETS, will play a crucial role in achieving this. It is due to be revised in June 2021. But there are also some new instruments that are being discussed, such as carbon contracts for difference (CCfDs)—which are designed to reduce uncertainty around emission prices for particularly innovative projects—and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM is intended to compensate for different carbon emission reduction objectives in different countries, and thus prevent “carbon leakage”: the shifting of carbon emissions to countries with less ambitious targets.

The Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN) event series at the Hertie Summit 2021 will focus on the question of which strategies are best suited to combating the climate crisis without jeopardizing the competitiveness of our industries.

Format: Part 2 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Part 2: German Climate Policy in the context of the EU Green Deal and ETS reform

Guests:

- Sarah Harden, Junge Union (Young Union of Germany)
- Ferike Thom, Jusos (Working Group of Young Socialists in the SPD) 
- Patrick Haermeyer, Grüne Jungend (Green Youth) 
- Nemir Ali, Junge Liberale (Young Liberals)
- Jan Schiffer, Solid (Left Youth Solid)

Moderator: Julian Lasinger, Board Member of the Hertie Energy and Environment Network

Format: Part 2 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: English

Concept by: Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN)

Agenda HEEN & Speakers' biographies (complete): t3://file?uid=13303

Diversity in contemporary art: attributions and mutual influences

Be it Vincent van Gogh, Frida Kahlo, Marina Abramović, Yoko Ono or Nina Simone, the work of modern artists is often a processing of experiences and fates. Their art is shaped by experiences and social circumstances. It is often the case that artists are initially considered outsiders due to the themes and issues they explore. However, through their work, they make these issues visible and often bring about a shift in public attitudes. It is therefore not uncommon for contemporary artists to be expected to point out problems and expose injustices. But is that really their job?

The workshop will approach this question through a direct exchange of views between participants and artists from Germany and abroad. The focus of the debate will be on the extent to which contemporary artists, who each have their own cultural backgrounds, shape the scene and ultimately society, but are also shaped by society in terms of their cultural origins.

Format: workshop

Who can participate: closed event

Guests:

Language: English

Organisers: Verdiana Albano, alumna of the START Foundation

New ways of working: are we agile enough?

Our world is in a state of flux, presenting us with ever more complex challenges that we must rise to meet at an ever faster pace. Organisations, companies and administrations have all recognised that we need new ways of working and a new culture of togetherness. As a result, the principles of New Work and agility, along with their methods such as Scrum, Kanban or Design Thinking have permeated the working world. But is everyone able to keep up with the pace?

In this 1.5-hour workshop, we will explore the question “Am I agile (enough)?” in a fun and interactive way. We will analyse our personal mindsets and use role play to experience when and how agile working can be applied in a practical way. You could apply what you learn here in many different roles: you could be a junior employee leading from below, or you could be in a leadership position in an administration, a company, or in the world of science.

All trainers follow agile principles and mould group dynamics to provide participants with an authentic experience. The aim of the workshop is to be able to assess skills and potential in the context of an agile working environment and to learn about how these skills can be applied in everyday life.

The two Fellows who run this workshop are Ulrich Grünewald, physicist, actor and media trainer, and Daniela Nguyen, biochemist and leadership/new work trainer. They met at the Hertie Summit in 2018 and have both inspired each other in their work.

Format: digital workshop (limited number of participants)

Language: German

Concept by: Daniela Nguyen, alumna of the START Foundation

Kick-off meeting for the mentoring programme (part 2)

This year, the mentoring program will kick off with a digital gathering of current mentors and mentees. There will be an introduction to the programme and the basics of mentoring, and the tandem pairs will get to know each other and all the other participants. The digital gathering will be the foundation for cooperation over the next eight months, both in the tandem pairs and in the group as a whole.

For years, our mentoring programme has been supporting Fellows who want to help shape society as active citizens and take on responsible roles in the areas of science, business, culture, politics and administration. The aim of the mentoring programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation is to provide targeted support for Hertie Fellows as current and future decision-makers and active shapers of the future as they work in the fields of science, business, politics, culture, civil society and administration. Here, mentors and mentees work together as equals. Each mentor supports their mentee with important aspects of their (early) professional life or with personal projects. The programme thrives as a result of the dedication of our Fellows in our diverse, international Fellows Network.

Format: workshop

Who can participate: closed event

Language: German/English

Organisers: Fellows & friends programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Friday, 4 June 2021

Welcome & Moderators

8:50 - 9:00 am Opening of the Hertie Summit's 2nd day (main stage)

Mona Mann and Sebastian Heunemann (Hertie Foundation) will guide you through the Summit's programme (in German/translated into English). 

From 9 am to 10:30 am

Programme Preview

"Talking to each other instead of about each other" - What can be done against racist attitudes, structures and patterns of action?

Language shapes consciousness and perception - not only how we ourselves talk, but also how we communicate as a society. Because language is power, or to put it in the words of Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison: "Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." 

Thus, racist attitudes, structures, and actions always have to do with how people are named, the identities to which they are limited or even restricted, and how conscious we are of our own language. Whether we speak of "clans," "xenophobic," or label someone or something as "exotic"; discriminatory terms and expressions are common. Yet there are plenty of alternatives - you just need to have (or learn) an awareness of discriminatory language and know these alternatives. In the workshop, we discuss the impact of language on racist thought patterns and look at examples of discriminatory language and imagery; we discuss supposed "speech bans" and the impact of these debates on society as a whole.
After the workshop, you will know concrete terms of discrimination-sensitive and anti-racist language. You will receive information on framing and the connection between language, discrimination, and racism.

Format: digital workshop

Who can participate: open to the public 

Moderator: Gilda Sahebi, journalist, physician and author 

Language: German 

Concept: Gilda Sahebi, journalist, physician and author 

Social change needs composure: on the wisdom of the Stoics

The workshop is a hands-on introduction to the philosophy of Stoicism, highlighting the parallels between Stoic thought and modern psychology, and is designed to be interactive with exercises.

Format: Workshop

Who can participate:  open to the public

Guest: Dr. Martin Ebeling, philosopher and head of  The School of Life Berlin's business program

Language: English 

#discovering new territory: Exhibition talk with curator Tine Nowak

Let's imagine digitization and its consequences for society and the individual as a large country: A terrain that is already familiar to us in parts - but in which there is also still an infinite amount to discover! Curator Tine Nowak (Museum für Kommunikation Frankfurt) invites you to take a look behind the scenes of the exhibition "#neuland: Ich, wir und die Digitalisierung“. From the conception to the set-up in the museum under corona conditions, she offers insights and opportunity for follow-up questions on the topic of curating a large temporary exhibition. It also presents exhibits and themes of the departments "Identity, "Communication" "Optimization", "Relationships" and "Knowledge". The exhibition has been conceived as a reflection event and dialogue space on the digital transformation. 

Digitalization creates fields of tension that challenge us as individuals and as a society. As if in a burning glass, this can be seen in Corona times: Online tools and methods are establishing themselves, and at the same time, the Internet is also creating space for disinformation. The exhibition #neuland goes on a discovery tour and shows practices and places of the digital in our everyday life and asks how we want to shape a digital society. So how do we want to communicate with each other?

The exhibition is a cooperation of the der Museumsstiftung Post und Telekommunikation and the Nemetschek Foundation. It opened in 2020 at the Museum für Kommunikation Frankfurt. It will continue to be integrated into the permanent exhibition at the Museum für Kommunikation Nuremberg as the #neuland tour until the end of 2021 and will be on display at the Museum für Kommunikation Berlin from February 2022.  www.ausstellung-neuland.de

Format: Talk

Who can participate:  open to the public 

Speaker: Tine Nowak is an exhibitions officer at the Museum für Kommunikation Frankfurt, where she previously served as project manager of "Living & Learning X.0. Digital Education Our Future" and curated the #neuland exhibition as part of that project.

Language: German

To the point: communicating scientific findings clearly and coherently (part 1)

Scientists today are often required to convey the essentials of what they have to say convincingly and concisely. This may be in a presentation, in a meeting, on committees, or at external events. But this requirement is often in conflict with the nature of science, since the complexity of the facts is the very thing that science aims to describe. The trick is to present complex information and facts in such a way that the audience can quickly see what is important. This online training seminar will teach you how. We will give you the rhetorical tools make your message more succinct and memorable. We will also introduce you to the technique of pyramidal communication, which you can use as a framework for complex problem solving and thereby increase and focus your impact.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the training seminar you will be able to:
- Get to the heart of highly complex and complicated ideas in the context of science in a quick and systematic way
- Present your message to important panels/decision-makers in a clear and concise manner
- Build a watertight, focused argument
- Use images, analogies and examples to convey your own message convincingly
- Use various techniques to highlight the relevance of your arguments

Language: German

Format: workshop

Who can participate: digital workshop (limited number of participants)

Trainer: Anita Hermann-Ruess, Founder and Managing Director of Hermann-Ruess & Partner, Max Ott, Trainer and Coach at Hermann-Ruess & Partner

The opportunities and challenges of neurological self-help

Neurological diseases have been on the rise in our society for years. These diseases occur in all age groups and pose many everyday challenges for those affected by them. For many patients and their relatives, self-help is often the first port of call when looking for information from independent sources that is easy to understand and is often based on personal experience. Self-help also plays an advisory role in decisions in the health system, often takes a stand on the most diverse political issues and organises itself in associations, and other organisational forms in order to meet these numerous demands placed on it. Patients may need to take on a wide variety of roles in the context of self-help. At first, their role may be the enlightened patient. Then they may become an expert in their own particular area of interest, and they may be involved in shared decision making between doctor and patient.

Format: workshop

Who can participate:  upon personal invitation

Guest: Dr. phil. Christopher Kofahl is Deputy Director of the Institute for Medical Sociology (IMS) at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf.

Moderation: Dr. Sabine Schipper, Managing Director of the NRW Regional Association of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society (DMSG) and Herbert Temmes, Managing Director of the Federal Association of the DMSG

Language: German

Networking

10:30 - 11:00 am During the break you can use the opportunity to meet other participants in the networking area. 

From 11 am to 12:30 am

Programme Preview

Conspiracy narratives as radicalization accelerators

Conspiracy narratives have been on everyone's lips since the beginning of the Corona pandemic. However, the belief in a grand conspiracy is by no means a new phenomenon. Such stories seem particularly appealing in times of crisis, as they cleverly tap into psychological needs that we all carry within us. This lecture will address the question of what makes conspiracy narratives so fascinating and how such narratives are used as radicalization accelerators, especially in the extreme right-wing scene.

Guest: Katharina Nocun, Civil Rights Expert and Economist, Expert on Conspiracy Narratives and Author 

Moderation: Philipp Darius, doctoral student at the Hertie School and trainer at the Business Council for Democracy Project (BC4D)

Format: Lecture 

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: German 

Organiser: Anna Delius, Business Council for Democracy, Hertie Foundation 

Career switchers, not career politicians: do we need new career paths into politics?

Political parties have a major influence on the selection of political candidates in Germany. Because of how their recruitment processes work, the path into politics has become a very narrow one. Voters are increasingly dissatisfied with the “career politicians” that result from these processes, and this is contributing to the current democratic deficit. However, there are hopes that making the processes for the recruitment of members of the Bundestag (Federal Parliament), members of the Landtags (state parliaments), and the recruitment processes for full-time local politicians more accessible will have a positive effect. This approach could increase the public’s acceptance of parliamentary democracy and of political decisions. 

Some Fellows of the Hertie Foundation are already involved in politics, and there are others who may have been thinking about seeking a mandate. In this workshop, we will talk to successful career changers who are now working in federal, state and local politics about their personal motivations and about their parties’ motives for opening up a career in politics to career-switchers. We will also discuss how politically interested people from other professions, for example scientists or academics, can be motivated to seek a political mandate after a successful career. Finally, we will discuss whether more open selection processes and more career-switchers in politics can actually help reduce disenchantment with politics. 

Format: digital workshop 

Who can participate: open to the public 

Guests: 

Prof. Karl Lauterbach, Member of the German Bundestag, Social Democratic Party, health expert. Until his election to the Bundestag in 2005, he was Director of the Institute for Health Economics and Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Cologne.

Dr. Uwe Schneidewind, Mayor of Wuppertal since November 2020, economist. Before his election, he was Scientific Director of the Wuppertal Institute for Research for Sustainable Development

Moderator: Elisabeth Niejahr, Hertie Foundation

Language: German

Concept by: Christoph Seils, Hertie Foundation

Democracy & climate crisis: EU ETS Developments in the context of the EU’s 2030 Climate Targets

Europe is meant to become climate-neutral by 2050. This is what the Green New Deal requires. The European Commission launched the European Green Deal as a flagship initiative to introduce climate legislation aimed at achieving climate neutrality. The goal of zero net greenhouse gas emissions will require a massive reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also require us to move away from burning fossil fuels and invest in clean industrial systems and energy systems. The EU’s main instrument for reducing emissions, the EU ETS, will play a crucial role in achieving this. It is due to be revised in June 2021. But there are also some new instruments that are being discussed, such as carbon contracts for difference (CCfDs)—which are designed to reduce uncertainty around emission prices for particularly innovative projects—and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM is intended to compensate for different carbon emission reduction objectives in different countries, and thus prevent “carbon leakage”: the shifting of carbon emissions to countries with less ambitious targets.

The Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN) event series at the Hertie Summit 2021 will focus on the question of which strategies are best suited to combating the climate crisis without jeopardizing the competitiveness of our industries.

Part 3: EU ETS Developments in the context of the EU's 2030 Climate Targets

Guests:
- Sebastian Rilling, EU Power & Carbon Markets Analyst, ICIS
- William Acworth, Head of Secretariat, ICAP
- Juliette de Grandpré, Senior Policy Advisor, WWF
Moderator: Emma Krause, Carbon Markets Advisor, ICAP

Format: Part 3 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: English

Organisers: Hertie Energy and Environment Network of the fellows & friends programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Agenda HEEN & Speakers' biographies (complete): t3://file?uid=13303

Digital transformation for the common good: digital ethics solutions

Digitalization, with all its aspects, has complex effects on our lives. On the one hand, a large proportion of Millennials and the Generation Z consider themselves digital natives, but on the other hand, few are aware that they are constantly generating data with their electronic devices, which is used for the further development of algorithms and artificial intelligence. Algorithms are applied to our most banal pursuits on sales platforms, in dating portals and with streaming service providers, but they also affect the most sensitive issues of our democratic society, such as election advertising, online communication and warfare.

Carla Hustedt has been working on the ethical consequences of algorithms and artificial intelligence for years. Based on her experiences, she will give an insight into the regulation of digital technologies, the conflict between digital innovations and regulation, and the question of how we can solve the digital transformation in our society in a way that is oriented towards the common good.

Format: lecture

Who can participate: open to the public

Guest:  Carla Hustedt, Director „Centre for Digital Society“, Mercator Stiftung 

Moderator: Victoria Boeck, research associate in the field of Open Data at the Technologie Stiftung Berlin

Language: German

To the point: communicating scientific findings clearly and coherently (part 2)

Scientists today are often required to convey the essentials of what they have to say convincingly and concisely. This may be in a presentation, in a meeting, on committees, or at external events. But this requirement is often in conflict with the nature of science, since the complexity of the facts is the very thing that science aims to describe. The trick is to present complex information and facts in such a way that the audience can quickly see what is important. This online training seminar will teach you how. We will give you the rhetorical tools make your message more succinct and memorable. We will also introduce you to the technique of pyramidal communication, which you can use as a framework for complex problem solving and thereby increase and focus your impact.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the training seminar you will be able to:
- Get to the heart of highly complex and complicated ideas in the context of science in a quick and systematic way
- Present your message to important panels/decision-makers in a clear and concise manner
- Build a watertight, focused argument
- Use images, analogies and examples to convey your own message convincingly
- Use various techniques to highlight the relevance of your arguments

Language: German

Format: workshop

Who can participate: closed event

Trainer: Anita Hermann-Ruess, Founder and Managing Director of Hermann-Ruess & Partner

Organisers: "Studying the Brain" Team of the Hertie Foundation

General meeting of the Initiative Starke Schule (Strong School Initiative)

We intend to use this general meeting to pause and take stock—it has been quite a memorable school year—but we also want to look ahead to the coming school year, further develop ideas and exchange ideas. Which formats have been a success? What are we planning for the near future, and for the long term? What do we need for these plans? What are the next steps for the development of our network?

There will be a moderated discussion of these questions and many more, moderated by the coordination team. We hope you will take part and share your ideas!

Format: internal meeting

Who can participate: only members of the Initiative Starke Schule

Language: German

Concept by: Initiative Starke Schule (Strong School Initiative)

Digitalisation and modern neurological self-help formats

Digitalisation was a challenge in self-help even before the coronavirus pandemic. Social media, new formats of knowledge transfer such as explanatory videos, podcasts, e-learning, and the recent increase in demand for gamification of the services offered place high demands on self-help organisations, especially when it comes to winning over the younger generation, since they often expect these types of services to be available as a matter of course. The fact that there is more to self-help than just the discussion group format is also demonstrated by the many opportunities for active participation it offers, in which sharing with each other is made easier for many participants because they are doing things together. 

Format: Workshop

Who can participate:  upon personal invitation

Guest: Franzisca Hetzer Projektleitung Verbandsbetreuung/Monitoring, BAG Selbsthilfe

Moderator: Dr. Sabine Schipper, Managing Director of the NRW Regional Association of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society (DMSG) and Herbert Temmes, Managing Director of the Federal Association of the DMSG

Language: German

From 12:35 pm to 1:25 pm

  • Infohour on the history of the Gemeinnützige Hertie-Stiftung with John-Philip Hammersen and Dr. Grzegorz Nocko (German)
  • How important is memory? A discussion about dealing with dementia with Anne-Kathrin Broda, High School Absolvent from Spremberg and Saskia Weiß, Vice Managing Director of the German Alzheimer Society (DAG). Moderator: Dr. Eva Koch 

From 1:30 pm to 3 pm

Programme Preview

Hate and disinformation on the internet: what can politics and business do to counter it?

In many areas, digitalisation is bringing about social progress. However, at the same time, it poses enormous challenges to democracies worldwide. Online hate speech, targeted disinformation and conspiracy narratives are spreading even faster around the digital world. Mistrust of state institutions and public media among citizens is growing. A new European law has been proposed in an effort to counteract this. Through the Digital Services Act, the EU hopes to limit the power of tech companies and force them to delete illegal content. There are great expectations for this law at the political level. But what role can civil society and business play in restoring trust in democratic institutions? Don't employers also have a responsibility to strive to strengthen democracy? After all, they benefit from being located in democratic countries.

Guests:
- Philipp David Darius, PhD student at Hertie School, Author/Trainer at BC4D
- Carline Mohr, Head of Newsroom for the SPD (Social Democratic Party of Germany)

- Lasse Osteneck, Project manager, Integrity & Legal Affairs department/ Strategy & principles, Volkswagen Group

Moderator: Daniel Erk, Journalist and Hertie School alumn 

Format: Panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: German / Englisch / German Sign Language

Concept by: Moritz Lankes, student at the Hertie School and member of the Business Council for Democracy (BC4D) project

Democracy as a key to unlock state power south of the Sahara

In this talk, Kasyoka Salim Mutunga, winner of the 2020 Hertie Essay Prize addresses the importance of democracy in unleashing state power. In Germany, the former Social Democratic Party foreign minister, Sigmar Gabriel, recently lamented that “we have talked the state down for 30 years”. While the effect of this “taking down” might only be apparent in the west today, it had severe repercussions in sub-Saharan Africa. The extreme focus on economic development in these countries led to an almost disregard or at times, disdain for state power — with parties, including the international community, choosing to empower a fictitious and absent private sector instead. The result, as Mutunga postulates, is the prevalence of weak, ineffective states, unable to marshal up enough power to adequately respond to the needs of their societies. While some might argue that democracy's purpose is to curtail state power, when democracy is instead understood as the recognition of the legitimate rights of a people to democratically map out their own destinies and determine their own development, Mutunga argues, that it becomes essential in galvanising and legitimising state power — understood as not only the power of the state (its own apparatus) to act; but also, the power of the state to oblige its own people to act. The presentation hopes to make the argument that the pursuit of state power and effectiveness is in and of itself, the pursuit of a truer form of democracy. She is convinced, that today, as we stand on the cusp of change in what seems to be a world in transition, our recalibration of the old order should begin with a restudy of democracy.

Format: Lecture

Who can participate: open to the public

Guest: Kasyoka Salim Mutunga, winner of the Hertie Essay Prize 2020, Kenyan advocate and Assistant Research Associate at the Commonwealth Secretariat in London

Moderator: Sascha Heller, project manager IES Abroad & Hertie School graduate

Language: English

Democracy & climate crisis: New tools in the box - How can CBAM and CCFD tackle carbon leakage?

Europe is meant to become climate-neutral by 2050. This is what the Green New Deal requires. The European Commission launched the European Green Deal as a flagship initiative to introduce climate legislation aimed at achieving climate neutrality. The goal of zero net greenhouse gas emissions will require a massive reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also require us to move away from burning fossil fuels and invest in clean industrial systems and energy systems. The EU’s main instrument for reducing emissions, the EU ETS, will play a crucial role in achieving this. It is due to be revised in June 2021. But there are also some new instruments that are being discussed, such as carbon contracts for difference (CCfDs)—which are designed to reduce uncertainty around emission prices for particularly innovative projects—and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM is intended to compensate for different carbon emission reduction objectives in different countries, and thus prevent “carbon leakage”: the shifting of carbon emissions to countries with less ambitious targets.

The Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN) event series at the Hertie Summit 2021 will focus on the question of which strategies are best suited to combating the climate crisis without jeopardizing the competitiveness of our industries.

Part 4: New tools in the box: how can CBAM and CCfD tackle carbon leakage?

Guests:
- Christopher Kardish, Carbon Markets Advisor, ICAP
- Matthias Schimmel, Managing Consultant, Guidehouse
- Philip Nuyken, Expert for Climate and Energy Policy, The Federation of German Industries (BDI)
- Jana Nysten, Lawyer, Stiftung Umweltenergierecht (Foundation for Environmental and Energy Law) 

Moderator: Tim Banning, Senior Expert International Energy Policy, DENA (German Energy Agency)

Format: Part 4 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: English

Organisers: Hertie Energy and Environment Network of the fellows & friends programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Agenda HEEN & Speakers' biographies (complete) here as pdf

Political participation: What young people can expect in the super election year

There can be no democracy without free elections. There is broad support for this principle. The question of who should be allowed to vote in a democracy is another matter entirely. Initially, the right to vote was the privilege of just a few citizens. Later, it became the hard-won right of ever broader sections of the population. But one group is still excluded from voting in elections today: children and young people. Is this still appropriate or should electoral law be reformed in this respect? This is a heated debate that has been going on for some time.

Some German federal states have already lowered the voting age, and in these states, 16-year-olds are now allowed to vote. Lowering the voting age from 18 to 16 is now being discussed at the federal level. In this digital practice session, we will use the various upcoming state and local elections as well as the 2021 federal election in Germany as an opportunity to talk about youth participation. We want to find out what young people think about the upcoming elections. What services and tools are available to young people who want to learn about elections? What kind of political education would be needed in order for young people to be able to participate? And what role does age really play in this?

Format: Panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests: 

- Dr. Jan Eichhorn, dpart – research for political participation 

- Ramona Hinkelmann, Berlin Youth Council  

- Julius Oblong, Team Tomorrow

- Nina Siemer, Assistant to First-time Voters 

Moderators: Hannah Beitzer & Agata Werner, Team "Jugend entscheidet" 

Language: German

Organisers: Team "Jugend entscheidet" of the Hertie Foundation

To the point: communicating scientific findings clearly and coherently (part 3)

Scientists today are often required to convey the essentials of what they have to say convincingly and concisely. This may be in a presentation, in a meeting, on committees, or at external events. But this requirement is often in conflict with the nature of science, since the complexity of the facts is the very thing that science aims to describe. The trick is to present complex information and facts in such a way that the audience can quickly see what is important. This online training seminar will teach you how. We will give you the rhetorical tools make your message more succinct and memorable. We will also introduce you to the technique of pyramidal communication, which you can use as a framework for complex problem solving and thereby increase and focus your impact.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

After the training seminar you will be able to:
- Get to the heart of highly complex and complicated ideas in the context of science in a quick and systematic way
- Present your message to important panels/decision-makers in a clear and concise manner
- Build a watertight, focused argument
- Use images, analogies and examples to convey your own message convincingly
- Use various techniques to highlight the relevance of your arguments

Language: German

Format: workshop

Who can participate: closed event

Organisers: The "Studying the Brain" Team at the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

New Work in administration and the non-profit sector: how circle concepts promote teamwork

Increasingly, employees in administrative and non-profit sectors want new forms of collaboration using agile methods. This is because these methods facilitate short communication channels, self-organisation and adaptive planning. This approach allows teams to align themselves with goals they define for themselves.

Agile methods such as Scrum have already been in use in software development for some time now. However, these methods are not always suitable for public administration or the non-profit sector, where the staff is mainly made up of subject specialists, project staff and administrators. We therefore developed the circle concept for these groups.

Working in circles strengthens teamwork, reduces silo structures and promotes efficiency and transparency. Jointly defined goals make it easier to prioritise tasks. This helps align long-term strategic tasks with priority ad-hoc tasks. In everyday practice, an online task board is used to support this approach. Working together in circles also helps to link up the activities of various staff members and thus make better use of synergies.

Using this digital format, supported by a whiteboard, we will discuss with the participants what exactly focus and development circles are all about, what we have learned from testing them in the digitalisation unit at the German Red Cross (DRK) and how this approach can also be transferred to other organisations.

Format: workshop

Who can participate: limited numbers, max. 20 participants

Language: German

Organisers: Kassandra Becker, alumna of the Hertie-Innovationskolleg (Center for Advanced Practitioners)

Acting in solidarity: how can we strengthen the sense of community?

Solidarity is high on the agenda at the moment. But what does “acting in solidarity” reality mean? How is solidarity established? What forms does acting in solidarity take? In this interactive workshop run by the START Alumni Association, participants will work out answers to these questions with the help of a digital planning game. In the game, incentives both large and small are used to show how a sense of community can be strengthened and how a community can grow as a result. We particularly welcome former START scholarship holders who are already organising themselves in solidarity with others and those who are trying out their own projects and want to be inspired by ideas of solidarity. All summit participants who are interested in ideas and tips for action in the field of solidarity-based trade or digital art are also very welcome to attend. And of course anyone who is open to discovering new things is welcome to participate.

Format: workshop

Who can participate: limited numbers, max. 20 participants

Language: German

Organisers: Amani Al-Addous and John Denis Gay, Board Members of START Alumni e. V.

From 3:05 pm to 3:55 pm

  • Reading of "Wir machen das schon. Lausitz im Wandel ("We'll get it done. Lusatia in transition")  with Dr. Johannes Staemmler. Moderator: Julia Ihmels (German)
  • Reading of "Liebeserklärung an eine Partei, die es noch nicht gibt” (“Declaration of love to a party that does not yet exist”) with Hanno Burmester. Moderator: Daniel Erk (German)

From 4 pm to 5:30 pm

Programme Preview

From triage to order of vaccination priority: how should medical ethics issues be debated?

Currently, a virus is running rampant around the world, health systems are stretched to the limit, and although vaccines against the virus exist, they are not yet available in sufficient quantities. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, we are suddenly confronted with ethical questions that we have not had to consider in our everyday lives for a long time: who should be the first to receive the life-saving vaccine doses? Who should be treated and who will have to be turned away if hospitals are overloaded?

Usually, questions like these are mainly debated in professional circles. However, the coronavirus pandemic has now brought the debates on vaccination priorities and triage into the public eye, along with all the emotional force that goes with this topic. This clearly demonstrated what happens when discussion is conducted within the wrong framework with the wrong information: people feel uncertain, trust in decision-makers declines and people’s health is put in jeopardy. At this event, we will discuss who should lead these debates and where they should take place in order to have the best possible influence on policymakers.

Guests:
-Alena Buyx, medical scientist and research ethicist, German Ethics Council, TU Munich
- Dr. med. Marlene Heckl, physician and science journalist  

Moderator: Christina Noll and Florian Graz, grant recipients of the medMS Programme of the Hertie Foundation

Language: German

Format: Panel discussion

Who can participate: open to the public

Organisers: Christina Noll and Florian Graz, grant recipients of the medMS Programme of the Hertie Foundation

The democracy movement and human rights in Belarus: how can Belarusian civil society be supported from Europe?

Following the rigged presidential elections of the summer of 2020, fierce demonstrations were held by the democracy movement in Belarus. However, in full view of the world, the police brutally suppressed the protests. The fact that the Belarusian opposition movement is mainly led by women, including Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, who is now living in exile, also attracted much international attention. In this session, the Fellows network “Democracy is Central” (which focuses on democracy and rule of law in Central and Eastern Europe) together with “Netzwerk Europa e.V.” will look at the Belarusian protest movement and the future of Belarusian democracy from a European perspective.

We therefore invite you to a workshop on how best to support the Belarusian democracy movement and what role the EU and European civil society can play here in solidarity with the movement. Following three keynote speeches from the fields of politics and science, there will be four interactive skills sessions on the following topics: Human rights and civil society, free and independent press, academic freedom and arts and culture. Guided by experts, we will discuss this topic with you and our guests from Belarus, Brussels and Berlin. The debate will be moderated by a professional moderator. This interactive format has a clear goal. The ultimate aim of the discussion is not only to raise new questions, but also to develop concrete proposals for solutions to pressing problems.

Format: interactive workshop

Who can participate: open to the public

Guests:

- Dr. Jens Adam, Cultural and Social Anthropologist, Excellence Chair Research Group “Soft Authoritarianism”, University of Bremen

- Aleksandra Gubskaya, Communication Expert, Minsk

- Elisabeth Kovtiak, researcher and artist, Charles University, Prague

- Maryna Rakhlei, Senior Policy Advisor, German Marshall Fund, Berlin 

- Maryia Rohava, Political Scientist, University of Oslo

- Prof. Gwendolyn Sasse, Director, Centre for East European and International Studies, Berlin

- Marian Vogel, Political Scientist, Hertie School, Berlin 

Language: English

Concept by: Ilyas Saliba, Netzwerk Europa e.V. and Anna Delius of Netzwerk Europa e.V. and the “Democracy is Central” Fellows network

Democracy & climate crisis: Accelerating climate neutrality - The role of participative movements, finance and businesses

Europe is meant to become climate-neutral by 2050. This is what the Green New Deal requires. The European Commission launched the European Green Deal as a flagship initiative to introduce climate legislation aimed at achieving climate neutrality. The goal of zero net greenhouse gas emissions will require a massive reduction in CO2 emissions. It will also require us to move away from burning fossil fuels and invest in clean industrial systems and energy systems. The EU’s main instrument for reducing emissions, the EU ETS, will play a crucial role in achieving this. It is due to be revised in June 2021. But there are also some new instruments that are being discussed, such as carbon contracts for difference (CCfDs)—which are designed to reduce uncertainty around emission prices for particularly innovative projects—and a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM is intended to compensate for different carbon emission reduction objectives in different countries, and thus prevent “carbon leakage”: the shifting of carbon emissions to countries with less ambitious targets.

The Hertie Energy and Environment Network (HEEN) event series at the Hertie Summit 2021 will focus on the question of which strategies are best suited to combating the climate crisis without jeopardizing the competitiveness of our industries.

NOTE:Afterwards a  HEEN Network Session, moderated by Andreas Schröder (HEEN Board), takes place.

Part 5: Getting to net zero emissions by 2050

Guests:

- Dr. Julian Zuber, CEO, German Zero 

- Maya Hennerkes, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (ERBD)

- Helen Tacke, CoZero 

Moderator: Céline Goehlich, Project Lead for "everyone energy” at the 100 prozent erneuerbar stiftung (100 percent renewable foundation)

Format: Part 5 of five panel discussions on Thursday and Friday

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: English

Organisers: Hertie Energy and Environment Network of the fellows & friends programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Agenda HEEN & Speakers' biographies (complete): t3://file?uid=13303

The new reality: the effect of the coronavirus pandemic on development work (part I: 4:00 - 5:30 pm, II: 6:00 - 7:30 pm)

The coronavirus pandemic has radically changed the work of development experts. Social distancing and travel restrictions have resulted in less direct physical contact with the communities we serve. In most cases, the effects of this have been negative. Work has been interrupted, resources have been lost and relationships have become more strained. There have also been some less obvious changes to the framework conditions for international development work. For example, in many Western democracies, protectionism has flared up again, which means that industry and private individuals are investing less in international development projects. However, in some cases, this new reality has also paved the way for innovation, which in turn has accelerated initiatives aimed at building up local capacity or providing alternative service models.

This forum will discuss both the immediate and longer-term implications. There will be two separate sessions. Each part will consist of a formal presentation by an expert in the respective field, followed by a moderated panel discussion. The ideas and perspectives developed during these sessions will be summarised in a short essay and subsequently made available to all Hertie International Development Network (HIDN) members.

NOTE: Please note that the workshop has two parts.

Part 1: 4:00 - 5:30 pm

Networking: 5:30 - 6:00 pm

Part 2: 6:00 - 7:30 pm

Guests:

Part 1

- Camilo Sánchez Meertens, Advisor, Liaison Presidential Council for Stabilization, Colombian Ministry of Health and Social Protection (Bogota)

- Mónica Wills-Silva, Principal Advisor - Co-Head of International Development, The Behavioural Insights Team (London)

Part 2

- Biggy Ngyuen, Product Owner 'Disaster Resilience Partnership’, Swiss Re (Zurich)

- Katri Bertram, Founding Partner, PFI - Partners for Impact (Berlin)

Format: workshop

Who can participate: open to the public

Language: English

Organisers: Hertie International Development Network of the fellows & friends programme of the Non-profit Hertie Foundation

Digital guided tour of the Städel Museum in Frankfurt "Beckmann's Frankfurt"

In the live format "Online Tour Beckmann" for the current special exhibition Städel’s Beckmann / Beckmann’s Städel  you will learn about the works as well as exciting facts about Beckmann's Frankfurt years between 1915 and 1933 through art educators. The multimedia experience as well as the direct transfer of knowledge are the focus of this online format.

Format: digital guided tour

Who can participate: open to the public

Moderator: art educators of the Städel Museum

Language: German